26/04/2012

HIMALAYA RIFLESSI DAL PROFONDO MUSEE ARTS PREMIERS GENOVA

Here's the presentation of an exhibition organized in the "Museo di Arti Primarie" (MAP) di Savona in the city of Genova in Italia (22 March 2012 / 30 April 2012)...

All the scuptures presented at this exhibition are from the A.M.Collection....

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When, in 1954, Giuseppe Tucci passed through the west lands of Nepal while looking for the vestiges of the Malla kingdom, extraordinary wooden effigies caught his attention within ‘hut’-sanctuaries or (perhaps as protection) near dangerous bridges and mountain passes. Tucci couldn't help alighting on the survival of confronting primordial animistic beliefs that survived in majority Hindu and Buddhism areas.
He noted down that he had come into a “religious world which is starting to intensify and to rage with no dogmatic patterns but a contradictory naturalness that lead to the origin .... To a country where life is old, but nothing has changed and where the human being keep unaltered fancies and dreads, imagines and hopes which had been anywhere else transfigured or forgotten by the current of the centuries.
Only by the end of the eighties were the enigmatic figures observed by Tucci studied and collected in the West, earning increasing and serious attention among studies of the prime arts.
The West Nepal sculptures are mainly wooden, but there are also significant stone models and small bronzes. It's often hard to understand the function of these works, which – as it usually happens among prime arts - are linked to rites and worships.
According to Marc Petit the figures could be classified through three main categories linked to their function:
a)patrons of villages and houses
b)guardians of bridges, mountain passes and fields
c)temple and sanctuary sculptures
We don't know the exact identities of the represented characters; they probably aren't gods but contributors (similar to Ex voto) or protective spirits who are able to guarantee the fertility of the fields and the safety during dangerous trips.
The effigies are often represented with the hands pressed together in the gesture called Namaste, which in Nepal is the common salutation indicating gratitude and respect. The sculptures are made by unknown artists or shamans (Dhami) called by the god to serve his believers. The first creator is often linked Nature, which, supported by Wind and Water, remove the veil of the surface leading the figures to the Spirit of the Archetype.
Going down Tucci's path, we may finish saying how these figures, “perhaps like no other art, manage to express the terror of the human being facing the mystery of life and death”.

Andrea Mordacci

 

 

I WISH TO PRESENT YOU SOME PICTURES OF THE EXHIBITION.........MORE TO COMES :

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copyright : A.M. Collection

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copyright : A.M. Collection

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copyright : A.M. Collection

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Giuliano Arnaldi and Erika Musso

copyright : A.M. Collection

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copyright : A.M. Collection

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copyright : A.M. Collection

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copyright : A.M. Collection

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copyright : A.M. Collection

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copyright : A.M. Collection

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copyright : A.M. Collection

09:32 Écrit par David Van der Elst | Lien permanent | Commentaires (0) |  Facebook |

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