31/07/2013

Sculptures tribales du Népal : Source d'inspiration - Jerome Bleton

En farfouillant sur le web à la recherche de nouveaux documents, je suis tombé sur le blog d'un illustrateur de livres pour enfant : Jerome Bleton. L'histoire de sa découverte des sculptures "primitives" népalaises par le biais de l'ouvrage de B.Goy et M.Itzikovitz (sculptures de bois au Népal - bouffons et protecteurs) m'a immédiatement rappeller le moment où j'ai moi même découvert pour la première fois l'art "primitif " népalais grâce au magnifique bouquin de C.Lequindre et M.Petit : "Népal, chamanisme et sculpture tribale"....

J'ai directement contacté Jerome Bleton pour lui demander si il voulait bien m'autoriser à publier sur mon blog l'article concernant sa découverte des sculptures népalaises publié sur son site et les quelques dessins qu'il y a ajoutés...Il a directement accepté

Avant tout, voici un lien vers son blog personnel : http://jeromebleton.blogspot.ca/

Et voici l'article (publié en Anglais) :

IL EST A NOTER QUE L'ARTICLE AUSSI BIEN QUE LES CROQUIS RESTENT SOUS LE COPYRIGHT DE Mr. JEROME BLETON

"The other day I stumbled upon this awesome art book:

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I had been looking at African tribal art books to get some inspiration for some character design I was doing. I love the African masks and fetish statuettes — these forms are just so strong and elegant and evocative — and I've enjoyed this kind of stuff for a long time. Ever since my mom got me an African mask at the bazaar near Barbès, in Paris, when I was a kid. (I remember that day quite well because, to my teen mortification, she took this purchase as an opportunity to flaunt her formidable bartering skills in an epic demonstration...) 

Anyways, in the same section at the library I found this book about Nepalese tribal art and I got really excited, because I had never seen anything like it. Some of these statues and masks are ritual objects, like the African ones, but a lot of them are just playful everyday objects, representing "buffoon" or protector spirits, which makes their inspiration somehow lighter or less ominous than the African fetishes.

The figures made me think of Polish theatre posters from the 60's and 70's or weird Czech animation or some Dave Mckean stuff. It was somehow familiar, and I felt this immediate affinity for this art. I wanted to draw some of the statues right away so that I could assimilate the forms and use them. I wanted to find a story in which I could use characters that look like these homely and reassuring buffoon spirits, although they are also primal and eery. I could see them as representations of some of my ugly thoughts maybe — my longing when I'm lonely; my reticence; my fear... I could see them skulking about, imprisoned and imprisoning, walking in circles in my mind.

Here are some drawing I made of these wonderful sculptures":

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copyright : Jerome Bleton 2012

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copyright : Jerome Bleton 2012

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copyright : Jerome Bleton 2012

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copyright : Jerome Bleton 2012

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copyright : Jerome Bleton 2012

 

 

Je souhaite chaleureusement remercier Mr. Jerome Bleton de m'avoir laisser reproduire cet article

01:31 Écrit par David Van der Elst | Lien permanent | Commentaires (0) |  Facebook |

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